greenhouse-wedding-venue-reclaimed-wood-sweetheart-table-greenery-overhead-low-centerpiece-rustic

Do Your Ceremony & Reception Need to Look the Same?

Discover whether you should consider changing up your color scheme.

If you find yourself with lots of ideas or you are unable to decide between two color schemes, you may wonder if it’s okay to have different aesthetics for your ceremony and reception.

Themes
greenhouse-wedding-venue-reclaimed-wood-sweetheart-table-greenery-overhead-low-centerpiece-rustic
Photo: Maya Myers Photography

When people ask you about various décor elements related to your big day, the most common question is regarding your colors. While more and more couples are choosing to embrace a natural, loose design for their florals and décor rather than a strict color palette, it is still perfectly common to have a few shades in mind while planning your wedding. If you find yourself with lots of ideas or you are unable to decide between two color schemes, you may wonder if it’s okay to have different aesthetics for your ceremony and reception.

rooftop wedding with lounge area on one side and chuppah made with lush greenery on the other
Photo by Joe Buissink Photography; Planning & Design by Alyson Fox, Levine Fox Events

The potential downsides to this plan may be somewhat obvious. There is a risk of your celebration not looking cohesive, and of course many couples repurpose ceremony décor – such as a chuppah or floral arch – into the reception as a way to highlight the sweetheart table or cake table. 

However, we’ve seen numerous real weddings that have utilized a changing color scheme to beautiful effect. For example, one couple started with a vow exchange featuring white flowers and other pale hues, while the cocktail hour featured blush blossoms, concluding in a reception full of deep pink florals – resulting in the entire event having an ombré palette. 

Some may also choose to have the ceremony be more classic and traditional, followed by a reception that gives everyone a chance to let loose and party. Those who get married in a church or house of worship may be limited in how much décor they can add, or the venue might have so much beauty that they don’t want to detract from it – which is also the case for some outdoor ceremony sites. A simple look for the vow exchange, especially when it is held in a different venue, can make entering a new room for the reception seem even more exciting. 

If you like the idea of a different design throughout your wedding events, but it just doesn’t feel right to you to have a drastically different reception, you can always throw an after-party. A late-night element after the first round of dinner and dancing is usually less formal and allows the newlyweds to embrace a more playful side for the design.

For more ideas, discover the steps to hosting a garden wedding and get tips for an all-white or neutral color palette.

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